The Farmhouse

One of the oldest homes in Ohio City, the Greenbrier Farmhouse holds a significant place in Cleveland and Black History. Its new floor plan combines historic elements with modern luxuries and finish materials appropriate to the home’s age and architectural style, but with modern function and aesthetic reflecting today’s lifestyle.

This home belonged to Alfred Greenbrier, a freed slave from Kentucky who arrived in Cleveland in the 1820s, for a period following the Civil War.

Once the structure was properly reconstructed and reinforced, interior framing of the new layout began. The new floor plan combines historic elements, such as a “hearth room” off the kitchen, with modern luxuries, including an en-suite master bathroom. All new mechanical, electrical, and plumbing systems were installed. Finish materials were selected to be appropriate to the home’s age and architectural style (wood flooring, natural stone tile) but with modern function and aesthetic reflecting today’s lifestyle. Wood moulding with eared door trim, complimentary window casings, and a simple base trim were recreated in a classic yet simple Greek Revival style. The original newel post, banister, and spindles were salvaged and reinstalled onto a newly-built staircase. The historic front facade detail was restored to its classic Greek Revival origins: a solid 6-panel door with recreated sidelites, 6-over-6 paned windows, engaged column details, and eared entablature.

Built sometime in the early-to-mid-1800s, the pre-Civil War era Greek Revival home is one of the oldest in historic Ohio City. When The Marinucci Group purchased 4019 Bridge Avenue, the building had been empty and neglected for years, causing severe deterioration of finishes and interior structure. Years of moisture in the sandstone basement caused significant rotting of the sill beam and first floor joists, compromising the entire first floor structure as well as the stability of the historic facades. The first step towards saving the structure was demolishing the first floor plate, jacking up the home to replace the sill beam, and stabilizing the home from the inside out.

During the demolition it was also discovered that the roof lacked a ridge beam, causing significant roof sagging and bowing of the original hand-hewn columns at the midpoint of the structure. A small area of foundation also became compromised once the weight of the house was lifted during the jacking.

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Architetta- Farmhouse
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Architetta- Farmhouse

Finish materials were selected to be appropriate to the home’s age and architectural style (wood flooring, natural stone tile) but with modern function and aesthetic reflecting today’s lifestyle.

Architetta- Farmhouse
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Before:

Rebuilding the structure of the home included repaired foundation; new sill plate; new LVLs to support new first floor joists; new ridge beam at the roofline with a midline support from roof to foundation; sistering all existing exterior studs in the balloon-frame construction; and reinforcement of the majority of the second floor joists through sistering and adding joist hangers.


 

Floor plans (After):